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Every mattress is built for a certain body type. How thick and firm the bed is, the materials used to make the comfort and support layers, foam density, coil gauge – all of these attributes can make a mattress feel more comfortable for people with certain body types, and less so for others.

If you weigh more than 200 pounds, a medium firm or firm mattress that conforms less and provides strong support will probably be the most comfortable option. You’ll notice we say “probably” – firmness preferences are subjective. A heavy person might prefer an ultra-soft pillow-top mattress, extra-firm tatami mat, or another bed with a different feel instead. We make general recommendations based on feedback from sleepers in different weight groups, but ultimately you are the best judge of the most comfortable mattress for your body.

We’ve shared our picks for some of the best mattresses for heavy people. These selections are based on ratings and reviews from verified mattress owners, as well as our own product research. Further down, we’ll detail the best mattress firmnesses, thicknesses, and materials for heavy people. You’ll also find an overview of basic mattress types, along with a look at pillows, toppers, and other bedding accessories for people who weigh more than 200 pounds.

Weight Disclaimer

Please note: For the purposes of this page, we are talking about individuals who weigh 200 pounds or more. Although we use the term heavy for brevity and convenience to describe sleepers, we do not use weight categories such as “average” or “overweight” as they can be misleading and dependent on the individual. We use 200 or more pounds as a practical standard of size when discussing how mattresses interact with sleepers’ bodies. We have found that individuals who weigh more than 200 pounds will have similar needs for a mattress in terms of firmness, thickness, and other factors with small individual variations.

The Best Mattresses for Heavy People

Our Top Picks

Titan

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Why We Recommend It:

The Titan’s firm comfort layers and strong pocketed coils offer excellent support for heavy sleepers.

$999 See Discount Price
Titan

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Saatva HD

Mattress Type: Innerspring

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Why We Recommend It:

Robust foams, responsive latex, and thick hourglass coils ensure the Saatva HD delivers exceptional comfort and support for people over 200 pounds.

$2,599 See Discount Price
Saatva HD

Mattress Type: Innerspring

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Big Fig

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Medium Firm (6)

Why We Recommend It:

Pressure-relieving foam and latex layers over sturdy pocketed coils make the Big Fig best suited to heavy sleepers who prefer a mid-level firmness.

$1,599 See Discount Price
Big Fig

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Medium Firm (6)

Helix Plus

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Why We Recommend It:

The Helix Plus offers a specialized hybrid design for heavier people at a very affordable price-point.

$1,199 See Discount Price
Helix Plus

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Firm (7-8)

Plank

Mattress Type: Foam

Firmness: Side 1: Firm (7) Side 2: Extra Firm (9)

Why We Recommend It:

The reversible Plank mattress is optimal for anyone who prefers a firm or extra firm feel.

$999 See Discount Price
Plank

Mattress Type: Foam

Firmness: Side 1: Firm (7) Side 2: Extra Firm (9)

WinkBed Plus

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Plus (8)

Why We Recommend It:

The WinkBed Plus is optimal for heavy sleepers thanks to its zoned latex and coil layers, which offer enhanced support for the shoulders, back, and hips.

$1,499 See Discount Price
WinkBed Plus

Mattress Type: Hybrid

Firmness: Plus (8)

Nectar

Mattress Type: Foam

Firmness: 6 (Medium Firm)

Why We Recommend It:

Three memory foam layers conform closely to the body, making the Nectar a good option for heavy people who prefer a deeper, pressure-relieving cradle.

$799 See Discount Price
Nectar

Mattress Type: Foam

Firmness: 6 (Medium Firm)

Product Details

Titan

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a firm feel
  • People who like sleeping on very responsive mattresses
  • Hot sleepers
Titan

The Titan by Brooklyn Bedding is specifically designed for sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds. The bed is constructed with layers of gel-infused memory foam and a second layer of TitanFlex foam, which has latex-like responsiveness for added bounce. These components, along with foam-reinforced pocketed coils, give the mattress a very firm and supportive feel. Heavy sleepers should experience comfortable conforming and pressure relief without sinking too deeply into the mattress.

We also recommend the Titan for hot sleepers because the coils promote steady air circulation to help the mattress maintain a comfortable temperature. If you sleep exceptionally hot, then you may want to consider a specialty cover made of phase-change material for your Titan. This component keeps the surface very cool regardless of how hot you feel. However, please note that this add-on will increase the mattress price.

The Titan also isolates motion fairly well compared to other hybrids, making it a good option for co-sleepers who experience movement-related disruptions, and the mattress offers great responsiveness for sex. Although the mattress provides excellent support for people who weigh more than 200 pounds, it will likely feel too firm for those who weigh 200 pounds or less. This is especially true for side sleepers, many of whom feel more comfortable on softer mattresses with extra padding for their shoulders and hips.

The Titan has a very affordable price-point compared to other mixed-foam hybrids. Brooklyn Bedding ships the Titan for free to all 50 states, and backs the mattress with a 120-night sleep trial and a 10-year warranty.

Saatva HD

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a firm feel
  • People looking for a responsive mattress with zoned support
  • Hot sleepers
Saatva HD

Introduced in 2019, the Saatva HD is one of the newest mattress models designed primarily for heavy people. The mattress has a comfort layer made of Talalay latex, a material that offers natural responsiveness and durability. The latex is also zoned to cradle your head, neck, and legs while reinforcing the shoulders, back, and hips. This ensures minimal sagging around the midsection – a common issue for sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds. The Saatva HD feels firm, but it includes a foam-padded pillow-top layer for those who need a bit of extra surface cushioning.

The support core consists of hourglass coils made of recycled steel. The coils have a low gauge of 12.5, meaning that they are fairly thick, and they are encased in high-density foam for added support along the perimeter. This results in less sinkage when you sit or sleep near the edges, which can be particularly beneficial for heavy people who feel less stable on beds with weaker edge support. The coils also promote steady airflow to help keep the mattress cool. Additionally, the latex is fairly breathable and will not trap as much heat as foam.

As is the case with other mattresses geared toward heavier individuals, the Saatva HD may feel too firm and not conform closely enough for some people who weigh less than 200 pounds – especially side sleepers. The responsive surface, while great for sex, may not isolate enough motion for couples, either.

The Saatva HD is somewhat expensive compared to other hybrids. However, Saatva offers free White Glove delivery for all mattress orders. This service includes in-home assembly and old mattress removal at no extra cost. The Saatva HD is backed by a 120-night sleep trial and a 15-year warranty.

Read Our Full Saatva HD Mattress Review

Big Fig

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a medium firm feel
  • People who like the contouring and responsive feel of a latex hybrid
  • Shoppers looking for a very durable bed
Big Fig

The Big Fig is a bit softer than most of our other picks. With a medium firm feel, the bed conforms a bit more to sleepers in order to cushion the back and reduce pressure in the shoulders, hips, and other sensitive areas. However, the Big Fig is constructed with a top comfort layer of gel-infused latex over three foam layers. These components ensure heavy sleepers won’t sink excessively despite the mid-level firmness.

The support core is composed of mid-gauge pocketed coils that provide excellent stability for sleepers while reinforcing the edges and minimizing sinkage. Heavy people won’t experience feelings of “roll-off” when sleeping near the edges, as they might on a mattress with less perimeter support. The coils also help regulate the bed’s temperature, and the latex layer is ventilated to promote steady cooling near the surface.

Because the Big Fig is designed to accommodate sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds, the comfort layers may feel a bit too firm for people who weigh less – though we’ve found the mattress is fairly supportive and comfortable for lighter back and stomach sleepers. The latex and coil layers are also fairly durable, so the mattress should have a reasonable lifespan.

Big Fig qualifies for free ground shipping anywhere in the contiguous U.S., and shoppers may choose White Glove delivery for an extra charge. The mattress is backed by a 120-night sleep trial and a non-prorated 20-year warranty.

Helix Plus

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a firm feel
  • Couples
  • Shoppers seeking a very durable mattress
Helix Plus

Part of Helix’s newest hybrid mattress line, the Helix Plus is the brand’s only model geared primarily toward heavy and/or tall people. Comfort layers of latex-like Helix Dynamic Response Foam and memory foam create a balance of body-conforming and responsiveness. This results in above-average pressure relief without too much sink for sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds. A high-density foam transitional layer and thick pocketed coils also offer extra support.

Thanks to its deep comfort layers, the Helix Plus isolates and eliminates motion transfer much better than many competing hybrids. The coils are reasonably quiet, as well. These attributes make the mattress a good option for co-sleepers who are easily awakened by their sleep partner’s movements. The bed’s materials are also fairly durable. You can expect the Helix Plus to perform for at least seven years, which is a longer-than-average lifespan for a hybrid model.

The Helix Plus is sturdy and supportive enough for any sleeper who weighs more than 200 pounds regardless of their normal sleep position. The balanced contouring is also suitable for many back and stomach sleepers who weigh between 130 to 200 pounds. However, people who weigh less than 130 pounds – especially side sleepers – will probably find the mattress too firm.

Compared to other specialty hybrids for heavy people, the Helix Plus has a very affordable price-point. Helix also offers free ground shipping within the contiguous U.S., along with a 100-night sleep trial and 10-year warranty for the mattress.

Plank

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a firm or extra firm feel
  • People who tend to sink too much on all-foam beds
  • Value seekers
Plank

The Plank by Brooklyn Bedding is a reversible mattress designed for people with firm preferences. One side of the bed has a firm feel, while the other side is extra firm. This makes the Plank best suited to sleepers over 200 pounds who tend to find all-foam mattresses too soft and prone to excessive sinkage. To adjust the firmness, simply flip the mattress onto its other sleep surface.

While both are fairly firm, each side of the Plank offers a distinct feel. The firm side is constructed with fiber padding, along with 2 inches of latex-like TitanFlex foam that contours to the body while remaining noticeably responsive. Thanks to strong support around the midsection, this side is best suited to back and stomach sleepers who weigh at least 130 pounds. Heavy side sleepers may also find this side comfortable, but its lack of cushioning may lead to added pressure on sensitive areas for some. We recommend the extra firm side for back and stomach sleepers looking for extra support around the lower back and hips.

Like other all-foam mattresses, the Plank may absorb and trap body heat, causing the mattress to sleep hot. You can select a special cover made of phase-change material for the mattress. This component helps the surface remain cool and comfortable regardless of your body temperature.

The Plank is a high-value mattress thanks to its low price-point and strong performance. Brooklyn Bedding will also ship the mattress for free to all 50 states. Lastly, the Plank is backed by a 120-night sleep trial and a 10-year warranty.

Read Our Full Plank Mattress Review

WinkBed Plus

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a firm feel
  • Shoppers looking for a mattress that offers zoned support
  • Hot sleepers
WinkBed Plus

The WinkBed Plus is another mattress primarily designed for heavy people. The mattress is built with a high-density polyfoam comfort layer and a transitional layer of responsive latex. This latex layer is zoned with different firmness levels to support your shoulders, lower back, and hips while cushioning the lighter areas of the body. This ensures even contouring and weight distribution without excessive sagging.

The WinkBed Plus’s pocketed coils are also zoned, with thicker low-gauge coils reinforcing the perimeter while thinner high-gauge coils offer more comfortable support for sleepers. This results in excellent edge support, meaning that most people should feel stable when sleeping or lying near the edges, and when getting in and out of bed. The mattress is a great choice for hot sleepers, as well, thanks to its breathable latex layer and steady airflow through the coils.

We recommend the WinkBed Plus to anyone who weighs more than 200 pounds regardless of their normal sleep position. The comfort layers cushion and conform closely enough to ensure better spinal alignment and adequate pressure relief for side sleepers, while back and stomach sleepers receive a comfortable balance of body-contouring and even support. The bed’s zoned layers also provide excellent support for stomach sleepers who weigh 130 to 200 pounds. Other sleepers may find the mattress a bit too firm.

The WinkBed Plus has an affordable price-point compared to other hybrid models. The company will also ship for free anywhere in the contiguous U.S. The mattress is backed by a 120-night sleep trial and a lifetime warranty.

Nectar

Who it's best for:
  • Sleepers who prefer a medium firm feel
  • People who like the conforming feel of a memory foam mattress
  • Couples
Nectar

We’ve discussed the benefits of even support and minimal conforming for heavier individuals, but some sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds prefer beds that contour closely to cradle the body and reduce pressure. The Nectar is an excellent choice for these sleepers. Built with three layers of memory foam, the mattress offers a deep body hug, but its medium firm feel prevents too much sinkage. This makes it ideal for those who prefer sleeping “in” – as opposed to “on” – their mattress, but still want to feel supported.

The Nectar is an excellent choice for couples, as well. The memory foam absorbs movement to significantly reduce transfer across the surface, and the mattress is virtually silent when bearing weight. A thick, high-density polyfoam base also provides decent perimeter reinforcement. As a result, the Nectar has above-average edge support compared to other memory foam models.

The mattress is particularly well-suited to heavier side sleepers due to its medium firm feel coupled with ample padding for the shoulders and hips. Back and stomach sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds may also find the mattress comfortable. The mattress conforms closely enough to reduce pressure in the lower back and hips while keeping back sleepers on an even plane. Many sleepers who weigh 130 to 200 pounds also find the mattress comfortable, which is typical for beds with mid-level firmness.

The Nectar has a very affordable price-point compared to other memory foam models. The mattress is also backed by a 365-night sleep trial and a lifetime warranty, both of which are much longer than average.

Read Our Full Nectar Mattress Review

Which Mattress Thickness Is Best for Heavy Sleepers?

What type of mattress is best for heavy sleepers? That depends on a lot of factors. For example, the thickness (or profile) can affect how a mattress feels for sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds. Mattresses sold today fall into three profile categories:

  • Beds that measure less than 10 inches thick are considered low-profile.
  • Beds that measure 10 to 12 inches thick are considered medium-profile.
  • Beds that measure more than 12 inches thick are considered high-profile.

Thinner mattresses are usually – but not always – firmer than thicker models. This is because the layers used to build up a thick mattress often make the surface feel softer. Despite their firm feels, some low-profile mattresses do not support heavy sleepers very well because their base layers are thinner. This can lead to uncomfortable sinking beneath the shoulders, back, and hips.

Typically, the best mattress for heavy people will be a medium- or high-profile model. Some people who weigh more than 200 pounds may find medium-profile beds more comfortable because they tend to be firmer than high-profile models. However, this may have more to do with personal firmness preferences than the bed’s height.

What Mattress Firmness Is Best for Heavy Sleepers?

Mattress firmness is measured using a 1-10 scale, with 1 being the softest and 10 being the firmest. Most beds sold today fall between 3 (soft) and 8 (firm).

Firmness preferences are subjective, but most heavy people find medium firm (6) and firm (7-8) mattresses most comfortable. The materials provide some body-contouring and pressure relief but the body won’t sink too much. An extra firm mattress (9-10) may be the better option for those who want a flush, practically non-conforming sleep surface. However, beds with this level of firmness are pretty rare and many sleepers – even people weighing more than 200 pounds – find them too firm.

In addition to body type, sleep position is another factor that can affect which firmness you prefer. If you’re a side sleeper, you’ll probably need more cushioning to align your spine and alleviate pressure, whereas back and stomach sleepers need less padding and more support to avoid lower back and hip pain.

Which Mattress Features Are Important for Heavy Sleepers?

Mattress features can strengthen and stabilize a mattress, resulting in even support and comfortable conforming for sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds. Some mattress brands tout their models with misleading descriptions, claiming the beds offer “universal comfort” or are suitable for people of any body type. Here’s the truth: each mattress model is constructed with materials that make the bed a better fit for different kinds of sleepers.

Rather than marketing claims from mattress brands, heavy sleepers should focus on the following attributes when choosing a new bed.

  • Mattress Type: If you prefer closer body-conforming and more pressure relief, then you might want to opt for a memory foam or all-polyfoam mattress. All-latex beds also offer decent contouring, as do airbeds with adjustable firmness levels. Hybrids and innersprings are better if you want more support and stability.
  • Contouring: For any given sleeper, ideal contouring should be close enough to reduce pressure along the shoulders, spine, and hips without sagging excessively. Beds that conform very closely often lack strong support, and this can lead to uncomfortable sinking for sleepers over 200 pounds, so moderate to minimal contouring is usually a good compromise.
  • Mattress Thickness: Medium-profile or high-profile mattresses tend to provide better support for heavy sleepers. Shorter beds may sag too much beneath the sleeper’s midsection, leading to an uncomfortable sinking feeling. However, beds thicker than 12 inches commonly have soft to medium feels due to their extra padding layers, and may not be supportive enough.
  • Quality Materials: All-foam mattresses with medium-density or high-density comfort layers sag less for heavy people than models with low-density layers. The same is true of organic and natural latex versus blended and synthetic latex. Thick coil systems in hybrids and innersprings are also important for overall stability and longevity, especially around the edges.
  • Firmness Level: For sleepers who weigh more than 200 pounds, beds that offer the best compromise of contouring and support usually have medium firm to extra firm feels. Softer beds – while often ideal for people who weigh less than 200 pounds – tend to sink too much for heavy people.
  • Pressure Relief: Heavy sleepers tend to experience pressure build-up in the shoulders, hips, and other areas on mattresses that don’t support the body properly. Pressure relief is somewhat tied to sleep position. Side sleepers often experience more pressure because this position does not naturally align the spine as back or stomach sleeping does.

What Type of Mattress Is Best for Heavy Sleepers?

Most mattresses sold today fall into one of five categories: hybrid, innerspring, latex, airbed, or foam. Despite some minor variations and notable outlier models, the mattresses in each category share consistent features, characteristics, performance ratings, and price ranges.

Hybrid

Definition: Hybrids are constructed with comfort layers of memory foam and/or latex over a pocketed coil support core. They are designed to cushion and conform to the body, but the coils usually give the surface a fairly supportive and responsive feel. Hybrids usually perform for six to seven years and have an average price range of $1,600 to $2,000.

Balanced Feel: Hybrid mattresses are a happy medium for many heavy sleepers because they offer the contouring and pressure relief of foam and latex beds, along with the strong support and consistent temperature neutrality of innerspring mattresses. Hybrid models with thicker coils usually provide the best stability if you weigh more than 200 pounds.

Innerspring

Definition: Most innersprings have relatively thin polyfoam comfort layers and a support core with non-pocketed Bonnell, offset, or continuous wire coils. Some have transitional minicoils, as well. Innersprings don’t conform very closely, and they feel responsive and bouncy. The average innerspring lasts for five to seven years and has a price-point of $900 to $1,100.

Exceptional Support and Breathability: Innersprings usually feel very stable because their coil support cores are considerably thicker than the comfort layers. Sleepers over 200 pounds remain on an even plane. You won’t sink very much, and you’ll experience little to no added pressure. Most innersprings promote steady airflow to help you sleep cool, too.

Latex

Definition: Latex is produced from the sap of rubber trees. The material is naturally responsive. It also contours to sleepers, but usually not to the same extent as foam. Latex is very durable, as well, and all-latex beds have a lifespan of at least eight years. The average price range for these mattresses is $1,600 to $2,000.

Long-Lasting Support: Latex won’t deteriorate and lose its shape as quickly as foam. This means better support and less sink over time, especially if you weigh more than 200 pounds. The material’s contouring ability is great if you want pressure relief without the body hug.

Airbed

Definition: Airbeds are designed with adjustable air chambers in their support cores. Owners can add or release air from the chambers to change the firmness of the mattress. Airbeds may also have foam, memory foam, and/or latex comfort layers. The average airbed costs between $2,000 to $2,400 and will perform for at least eight years if properly maintained.

Customizable Comfort: The major asset of airbeds is their firmness selection. Many of these models can be adjusted for soft or firm feels, along with a lot of different levels in between. Some are also engineered for dual-firmness with distinct feels on both sides of the bed. If your comfort preferences fluctuate from night to night, You should consider an airbed if your comfort preferences fluctuate from night to night, but be warned: these mattresses are generally very pricey.

Foam

Definition: Foam beds may have polyfoam and/or memory foam comfort and transitional layers, along with a support core of high-density polyfoam. These beds tend to conform more closely and alleviate pressure better than other mattress types. The comfort layers also absorb and isolate motion transfer for couples, and the beds are virtually silent.

Contouring and Pressure Relief: Foam beds are the best choice if you like close conforming, or if you experience pressure points in your shoulders, back, and hips. Heavy sleepers should choose a foam mattress that feels firm and supportive enough for their body, and will conform without sagging too much.

The Ideal Sleeping Environment for Heavier Sleepers

In addition to choosing the right mattress, you can optimize your sleep environment with certain bedding accessories. These include pillows, mattress toppers, and a suitable support system for your bed.

Pillows

Pillows often take a backseat to mattresses when we talk about comfort and support, but they’re a crucial component of your bedding setup. The right pillow can support the spine, alleviate pressure, and improve sleep quality and duration. The wrong pillow, on the other hand, can lead to added discomfort along the neck and shoulders, and may also contribute to spinal misalignment.

You should consider several factors when shopping for a pillow. Arguably the most important variable is loft, or thickness. Pillows may be low loft (shorter than 3 inches), medium loft (3 to 5 inches), or high loft (more than 5 inches). The pillow should pad the areas between your head, neck, and shoulders to support your spine. For this reason, the best pillow loft for a given sleeper primarily depends on their sleep position, as shown in the table below.

Sleeping Position Pillow Loft Reccomended
Back Medium (3″ to 5″)
Side Medium (3″ to 5″) or High (3″ to 5″)
Stomach Low (less than 3″)

 

The pillow fill and density are also crucial. Fill refers to the material used to pad the pillow’s interior, and these materials vary in terms of head and neck support. Some resist sinking and feel fairly stable, while others conform closely for more of a cradling sensation. Density – measured in pounds per cubic foot (PCF) – refers to how compact and heavy the fill material feels. High-density memory foam, for instance, will maintain a fuller shape and provide better support than foam with a medium or low density.

Common pillow materials include the following:

Memory Foam: Memory foam pillows may contain a single piece of memory foam. These pillows tend to be fairly dense and will maintain their shape fairly well, especially pillows with denser foam. Other models contain shredded memory foam. Shredded foam does not feel as firm or dense, but owners can usually add or remove foam to adjust the loft and improve support as needed.

Feather/Down: Feathers are coarse outer plumage found on ducks and geese, while down is the softer inner plumage from the same animals. These pillows generally feel very light and soft, and they do not provide strong support for the head, neck, and shoulders. As a result, you may not feel as comfortable on feather/down pillows if you weigh more than 200 pounds.

Buckwheat: Buckwheat pillows are filled with hulls, the hard outer shells of buckwheat kernels. These pillows feel exceptionally firm and offer strong, long-lasting spinal support. Their loft can be adjusted by adding or removing hulls, as well.

Polyfill: Polyfill pillows include those with down alternative, a polyester material designed to mimic the softness and lightness of authentic down. These pillows are a bit more stable than their natural counterparts but still tend to sink a bit. Another polyfill variety is interlocking polyester, which is designed to retain a fuller shape.

Mattress Toppers

A mattress topper is a cushioning layer placed on top of a mattress surface to change the bed’s overall feel. Most toppers are designed to make mattresses feel softer, but some feel fairly firm and can be used on soft beds. Toppers usually measure 2 to 5 inches thick. They can be made from materials such as memory foam, latex, convoluted (egg-crate) polyfoam, wool, and feathers/down.

You may benefit from a topper if your mattress offers good support but feels a bit too firm for your liking. Alternatively, a firmer topper may be useful if your mattress is excessively soft. Using a topper is a cost-effective way to adjust the firmness of a mattress compared to buying a new bed altogether. That said, toppers do not provide as much pressure relief due to their lower profiles. They are also less durable than mattresses, making them a somewhat temporary solution.

Bed Platforms, Foundations, and Box Springs

You can choose from different support systems for your bed. A traditional box spring features a wooden frame with steel springs and a cloth cover, which is placed on top of a bed frame. Box springs support mattresses with a flush surface so the mattress won’t sag, and the springs absorb shock from you and the bed. This makes them ideal for innerspring mattresses. Box springs provide decent stability for heavy sleepers, provided they’re well-made.

Foundations usually consist of a fabric-encased frame with slatted sides and a flush surface. They do not contain steel coils like box springs, but their surfaces tend to feel firmer and offer adequate support for any mattress type. Foundations are also placed on a bed frame with the mattress on top.

Platform beds feature a wooden or metal frame with evenly spaced slats to support the mattress, rather than a flush surface, along with legs and center support bars. Slat dimensions are crucial for platform beds because heavier mattresses will sag between the cracks if the slats are too widely spaced, resulting in loss of support and less durability. This problem may be compounded if you weigh more than 200 pounds. Platform beds with properly spaced slats, however, can offer the same support as box springs and foundations.